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Assassin's Creed's pirate stuff was too good to let die and Skull & Bones proves it

June 21, 2017 1 min read

Ubisoft's new pirate game, Skull & Bones, is a recycled idea. No one has delusions that it's wholly original, because its source material is so obvious. Ubisoft is borrowing from itself here, but not in a way that feels uninspired. Rather, Skull & Bones feels like the natural evolution and conclusion of a genuinely great mechanic.

Quick history lesson: The first iteration of Skull & Bones' pirating systems debuted in Assassin's Creed III. At the time, it was just a series of side missions but somewhere during development, Ubisoft realized it had a hook that could carry an entire game. The next series entry, Black Flag, was built around the ship stuff. People ate it up.

I have a minor confession to make. I didn't really like the naval direction of Black Flag (and Rogue, I guess). In a vacuum, I actually loved the sailing and sea dog combat. But, it wasn't what I wanted from an Assassin's Creed game. The emphasis on pirating stripped away too much of the running around large cities and jumping off tall things that I had come to mindlessly love.

Assassin's Creed's pirate stuff was too good to let die and Skull & Bones proves it screenshot

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