The animation of Thundercats Roar doesn't matter

May 30, 2018 2 min read

For the past couple of days, my newsfeed on Facebook has been ablaze with people talking about the new Thundercats TV show, Thundercats Roar, and none of it has been positive. People have insulted the show for pissing on the legacy of the original series, how much worse modern kids shows are compared to the ones we grew up on, and how American animation has become nothing but garbage. Cartoon Network has pretty much gotten under the skin of anyone that had access to a keyboard that grew up watching the channel in the late '90s and early 2000s.

I've always been a big proponent of animation of what kind of shows/movies kids watch. I always advocate for animation and stories that challenge and teach kids valuable lessons as well as entertain them with goofy and dumb fun. There can be a balance between the styles of kids' shows. Not every show has to be a super serious show that challenges both adults and kids, just as not every show has to be a dumb comedy that kids can laugh and reference with other kids. The difference is how those products are marketed and whether or not they're even good for kids. A movie like The Secret Life of Pets may be a silly kids movie, but it at least is not as toxic to a child's development as The Emoji Movie is. They both are trying to appeal to the same demographics, but one is clearly not as destructive as the other. 

So when I'm talking about Thundercats Roar and the reaction to it, I'm taking it from the approach of someone that watches some kids cartoons without a kid, loves anime, goes to see kids movies, and is someone that has been around the block a few times with the modern Cartoon Network. And after a little time to think about it, I firmly believe that people need to calm the hell down about Thundercats Roar and its animation. It isn't the end of the world, it isn't the low point in Western animation, and this isn't the darkest timeline. 

The animation of Thundercats Roar doesn't matter screenshot

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